Sensory System Proteins


 Sensory System Proteins Background

The sensory nervous system is a part of the nervous system. This sensory system is responsible for processing sensory information outside our body. A sensory system is consisted of sensory receptors, neural pathways, and parts of the brain involved in sensory perception. As a primary manufacturer, Creative Biomart provides recombinant proteins of several sources, grades and formulations for research applications about sensory system.

Vertebrate sensory neurons extend separate axons to central and peripheral nervous systems, and transmit sensory information from the periphery to the brain. Sensory neurons can be divided into two major groups: visceral afferents that innervate organs and somatosensory afferents that innervate skin, muscle and bone. The somatosensory nervous system can be further divided into cutaneous or skin afferents and those innervating muscle and bone. Cutaneous afferents can be differentiated based on their ability to respond to different stimuli. These stimuli are typically grouped into mechanical, thermal and/or chemical. Some cutaneous afferents have the ability to respond to more than one type of stimulation. There are two types of neurons that can respond to mechanical stimulation. Low threshold mechanoreceptors respond to stimuli equivalent to light touch or brushing. Stronger stimuli, such as pinch, are detected by high threshold mechanoreceptors also known as mechanonociceptors. In humans, specific populations of afferents detect warm, cold and hot stimuli, whereas others are sensitive to chemicals including acids and bases. Mice have a similar array of afferents, although neurons specifically sensitive to midrange temperatures (warming units) have not been found.